US Air Force successfully tests Israeli-developed air-to-ground missiles

The Have Light is extremely accurate, allowing an area as small as a building’s doorway to become a possible target. The US Air Force is likely to procure revolutionary air-to-ground missiles developed in Israel which will aid the United States …

The Have Light is extremely accurate, allowing an area as small as a building’s doorway to become a possible target. The US Air Force is likely to procure revolutionary air-to-ground missiles developed in Israel which will aid the United States in its war on terror. The new Have Light missile recently underwent successful tests by the Air Force.

The Have Light is an advanced air-to-ground precision guided system. The missile allows aircraft to destroy ground and sea targets, such as bunkers, power plants, missile sites, bridges, and ships, from long range. The Have Light is extremely accurate, allowing an area as small as a building’s doorway to become a possible target.

The US Air Force is currently testing the missile and an operational test of the system was performed recently. A US F-16 plane fired the missile, and the pilot successfully controlled it. Another test in Utah was described as successful, with the missile hitting a stationary target.

The Have Light missiles are accurate and cost effective, with a very high proven hit probability. The direction of the missile can be guided midcourse. With its ability to pinpoint targets at such a long range, the missile will minimize fighter aircraft exposure.

Another great advantage of the new missile is that it can be fired from ordinary fighter planes, not just heavy bombers, like the B-52, which fires other Rafael Popeye missiles. The new missile, actually a smaller version of the Popeye, is fired from a single-seat aircraft flying at 2,600 meters at Mach 0.7 speed.


The missiles are being marketed by a joint venture of Israel’s Rafael company and US aerospace manufacturer Lockheed-Martin. Rafael and Lockheed-Martin are partners in Precision Guided Systems US (PGSUS, which markets missiles worldwide, and has sales of $500 million to date.

Randy Bigum, vice president of Strike Weapons at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, said the company was satisfied with the Air Force test results. He said the missile will provide customers with quality high-level strike capacity against long-range naval and land targets.