Environmentalists say no to Red-Dead seas link [video]

Israeli, Jordanian and Palestinian environmentalists are challenging a World Bank-administered plan to revive the dying Dead Sea by linking it to the Red Sea.

It may look calm, but the Dead Sea is shrinking rapidly and there's a battle brewing among those who hope to save it. Photo by Doron Horowitz/Flash90.

It may look calm, but the Dead Sea is shrinking rapidly and there's a battle brewing among those who hope to save it. Photo by Doron Horowitz/Flash90.

A group of Israeli, Jordanian and Palestinian environmentalists have put politics aside to fight a $15 billion World Bank plan to revive the Dead Sea, which is dropping by about three feet a year. The bank’s plan proposes building a canal or tunnel to link the salt-laden sea to the Red Sea in the south.

The environmentalists, members of Friends of the Earth Middle East (FOEME), along with prominent businesses like Israel’s Dead Sea Works, believe the canal could destroy the sea’s fragile and unique ecosystem.

The Dead Sea, one of the saltiest bodies of water on the planet, is bordered by Israel, Jordan and the Palestinian Authority. While it doesn’t support marine life, it is bursting with minerals and salts which provide healing therapies for people suffering from cystic fibrosis to psoriasis.

Find out why the Dead Sea is shrinking and what plans are afoot to save it in our special ISRAEL21c report.

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