Yes, that bacon is kosher

Growing up, I didn’t have a very strong Jewish background. I never had a bar mitzvah, Yom Kippur was just another school day and Shavuot, well, what’s that? But Shabbat, now that was special – that was the day we …

Don't worry…it's 100% kosher

Growing up, I didn’t have a very strong Jewish background. I never had a bar mitzvah, Yom Kippur was just another school day and Shavuot, well, what’s that? But Shabbat, now that was special – that was the day we had bacon for breakfast! Now, I don’t want to insult anyone who’s never tried it, but I really loved bacon. That all ended in 1985, when I went kosher. For 26 years, bacon has not crossed these lips. Until now. No, I haven’t given up on kashrut. This bacon was 100% kosher. It was on the menu at a small, off-the-beaten-track French restaurant in Jerusalem called Moise. The kosher bacon at Moise is made from lamb, not pork, but it still has that greasy, oily, crispy texture and flavor I remember from my sacrilegious youth. The four pieces that come with the order are accompanied by several dates, walnuts, almonds…and peach slices. This was not the first time I’d heard about kosher bacon. Several years ago, while visiting Silicon Valley, I read about a kosher restaurant called The Kitchen Table that also served the dish. I asked Claude, our waiter and the co-owner of Moise, if he’d heard about The Kitchen Table before. Not only was he familiar, he said, but it was Haim David, the chef at that California establishment, who had taught Simone (Moise’s chef and Claude’s wife) how to make’n the bacon. David is now in Israel, studying at yeshiva in Safed. Beyond the bacon, the rest of the food at Moise is truly extraordinary, including a unique kosher bouillabaisse (the French fish soup staple that is usually made with mostly seafood). The restaurant is tres pricey, but the group buying website Groupon frequently offers half price deals and you can use two coupons per table, which really helps. But when it comes to bacon, the sty’s the limit.

About Brian Blum

Brian has been a journalist and high-tech entrepreneur for over 20 years. He combines this expertise for ISRAEL21c and Israelity as he writes about hot new local startups, pharmaceutical advances, scientific discoveries, culture, the arts and daily life in Israel. He loves hiking the country with his family (and blogging about it). Originally from California, he lives in Jerusalem with his wife and three children.
  • http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/Flash.aspx/195524 jerry

    vegetrian even better

    am yisroel chai

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  • Andy

    My friend Zac in Jerusalem makes and sells his own. He started doing it last year, curing, smoking, slicing, and packaging his own lamb belly. You can read about it here: http://jewishbacon.wordpress.com/

  • Bob

    A friend gave me some turkey bacon that tasted like real bacon but supposedly didn’t have any pork in it. After checking with the producer I found they used pork “renderings” to make the turkey smell and taste like real pork bacon. I dumped several pounds into the garbage. Be careful about ALL the ingredients of any product like this. If it tastes and smells like pork bacon it most likely does have pork of some kind in it.

  • Steven Stewart

    Any person who claims to be a jew and eat bacon is not playing with a full deck of cards.
    “End of Story”even a moslem isn’t stupid enough to eat Bacon or any pork product.
    Catholics eat pork and believe that god loves them which is like putting asign on your forehead “STUPID”

    Oh yeah and according to the west god has now changed his mind about 28,000 times plus and counting(Religious factions) about what he said to the jewish people…….ho hum..

    CHeers everyone …….not long now.

  • http://www.koshershopaholic.com Shoshana Raff

    I’m sure that I would enjoy this new Kosher version of bacon and the restaurant sounds awesome. So excited you can get Groupon for it!

    However, why does this lamb version have to be called ‘bacon’ – bacon by definition is pork and treif. I’m really not comfortable with trying to make it Kosher, Just give it a new name and describe it as the same part of the Kosher animal that bacon comes from….

  • Asher

    Does anyone remember Beef Fry or Bacochips, both of which purported to imitate the “real thing” but of course had the requisite hechsher? These may have been American products, but cannot say for sure.